Monitor Outlines Year Two for Cleveland Police Consent Decree

A mounted Cleveland police officer rides through the city during the Republican National Convention in July 2016.
A mounted Cleveland police officer rides through the city during the Republican National Convention in July 2016. [Nick Castele / ideastream]
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The monitors overseeing Cleveland’s police reform agreement are asking a federal judge to approve their plan for year two of the project.

In December, the monitor asked for changes to the city’s plan for upgrading equipment. That plan must be revised and finalized in the coming weeks.

The city also must submit a pilot program for officer use of body cameras in secondary, non-city jobs. The deadline for that is April 28.

The plan requires police to hire a civilian head of internal affairs by the end of May this year, and a police inspector general by December.

The city must also develop policies aimed at preventing racial and other biases in policing. A draft is due May 12, and the monitor is set to evaluate the final product by Nov. 21.

Also on the to-do list are reviewing use-of-force rules for canines and drawing up new search-and-seizure policies.

Cleveland entered the consent decree with the Justice Department in 2015 after federal investigators found evidence of excessive force. In January this year, the city outlined its progress and setbacks in fulfulling the decree. 

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