Shaker Heights native, David Pogue, discusses climate change preparation, latest U.N. report

Planet Earth from space. [NASA/24K-Production/Shutterstock]
Planet Earth from space. [NASA/24K-Production/Shutterstock]
Featured Audio

A U.N. report says there is no more time for talk when it comes to climate change.

A sobering report released this week from the United Nations concluded that the time for talk on climate change is over.  Now, the report, from the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says the time is for action if we are to have any chance of escaping the worst impacts from a changing climate.

The report takes to task the world’s governments and corporations for a legacy of broken promises and failure to take meaningful action.  Such inaction, U-N Secretary Antonio Guterres says moves us closer to creating an “unlivable” world.

Shaker Heights native David Pogue’s most recent book “How To Prepare for Climate Change: A Practical Guide for Surviving the Chaos” took an in-depth look at how individuals should be taking steps now, even as governments fail to do so.  Tonight, he will address the Cleveland Council on World Affairs’ Foreign Policy Forum.  The forum explores relevant and timely geopolitical topics.

Up next, there was a time when unions all but dominated our workplaces. What they said, did, and supported; mattered to employees, to companies, even to entire towns. Situations have changed  and unions have less clout now, but they still matter to many  especially when what they are seeking is equity and safety for the members a union represents. Which brings us to the five year saga of Daisy Pitkin, an Ohio-born labor organizer, sent to Arizona to help organize laundry workers at commercial and industrial operations.  Pitkin helped draft many of the people in her story, “On the Line,” to become organizers for UNITE: Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees.

Later, a documentary premieres tomorrow night (April 7) at the Cleveland International Film Festival, examining the May 4 shootings at Kent State University.  Four people were killed and nine others wounded, but the film examines one man who tried – and succeeded – in saving countless lives that day in 1970.  Ideastream Public Media's Kabir Bhatia spoke with co-producers Dale Omori and Harlan Spector about "American Heartbreak."

Guests: 

David Pogue, Correspondent, CBS Sunday Morning, Author, "How To Prepare for Climate Change"  
Daisy Pitkin, Labor Organizer, Author, "On the Line"
Dale Omori, Co-Producer, "American Heartbreak"
Harlan Spector, Co-Producer, "American Heartbreak"
Kabir Bhatia, Senior Reporter, WKSU, Ideastream Public Media

For More Information:

Cleveland Council on World Affairs web site

Support Provided By

More Wksu Schedule
More Wclv Schedule
Schedule
Donate
WKSU
WCLV
NPR Hourly Newscast
The Latest News and Headlines from NPR
This text will be replaced with a player.
This text will be replaced with a player.
This text will be replaced with a player.