Ohio becomes 23rd state to allow "permitless carry"

On the "Sound of Ideas," we discuss Ohio becoming the 23rd state to allow "permitless carry." [Straight 8 Photography/shutterstock]
On the "Sound of Ideas," we discuss Ohio becoming the 23rd state to allow "permitless carry." [Straight 8 Photography/shutterstock]
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Yesterday, Governor DeWine signed into law, Senate Bill 215, also known as "constitutional carry" or "permitless carry." 
The new law will allow Ohioans to carry concealed weapons, without a permit, and to have them without having first had any training. It would also no longer require gun owners to inform law enforcement during a traffic stop that they're armed, until the officer asks directly. 

Currently, Ohio requires conceal carry applicants have a minimum eight hours of training, which covers safety features, and public safety laws. They also pay a fee of at least 67 dollars, and must pass a background check. That goes away.

The new law will apply to anyone 21 or older, who is legally eligible to own and carry a firearm in the state. That means those currently banned from possesion, are still banned from possession.

This makes Ohio the 23nd state to allow permitless carry, with Alabama signing a similar bill into law just last week. Five other states are considering it, including neighboring Indiana, whose bill is on their governor's desk. 

Nationwide and statewide, proponents of the bill, including the National Rifle Association, and the group Buckeye Firearms, restate the claim that gun owners have a constitutional right to bear arms, and that the current requirements are a burden to law-abiding citizens. 

Opponents, which include gun safety advocates law enforcement officials, including Hamilton County Sheriff Charmaine McGuffey, and the Fraternal Order of Police of Ohio, have said the law would make Ohio more dangerous, for residents, and for the police. 

Backlash to the signing was swift, Ohio Democratic Party Chair Elizabeth Walters, Democratic gubernatorial candidate and former Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Desiree Tims, President and CEO of Innovation Ohio, were among many who filled our reporter's inboxes yesterday within minutes of the announcement, as did the group Buckeye Firearms and the NRA, in favor of Mike DeWine's action.

There's a lot to dig into on this topic, and this hour on the "Sound of Ideas," we've invited people with mixed of perspectives to weigh in. 

Guests: 

-Karen Kasler, Statehouse News Bureau Chief, Ideastream Public Media 
-Rob Sexton, Legislative Affairs Director, Buckeye Firearms
-Douglas Cooper, Owner & Chief Instructor, Arm the Populace
-State Rep. Adam Miller (D-Columbus)
-Bill Kosteas, Ph.D., Economics Professor and Associate Dean, Cleveland State University

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