Busy calendar of festivals and events promises surging year for Ohio tourism

Road sign welcomes travelers on Route 50, crossing from West Virginia into Ohio. [Rosemarie Moste/Shutterstock]
Road sign welcomes travelers on Route 50, crossing from West Virginia into Ohio. [Rosemarie Moste/Shutterstock]
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Ohio tourism is on the rebound.  In-state and out-of-state visits in Ohio in 2021 reached near pre-pandemic levels.  The tourism forecast for 2022 ahead is even brighter, according to state officials.

A report from the state’s tourism agency, Tourism Ohio, found the total economic impact from tourist activity last year resulted in about $47 billion in spending.  Those numbers include all tourism activities from day trips to out of state vacationers.

The state’s director of Tourism Ohio says the bulk of research shows that 90-percent of people surveyed plan to travel in the next six months.

Festivals, concerts, and other events put on hold by the pandemic are making comebacks.

We discuss the rebounding tourism economy with the director of Tourism Ohio and the organizers of two Cleveland festivals.

Ohio.org listing of statewide festivals and events

Ohio tourism web site

But first,  in February the Cleveland Clinic embarked on a landmark study designed to better understand brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, MS, and Parkinson's with the goal of identifying diseases earlier and with the aim toward earlier more effective treatments and perhaps one day cures or even prevention.
 

The long-range study which will last up to 20 years and involve 200,000  participants has already grown larger.   The State of Ohio granted the Clinic $2 million dollars to expand the landmark brain study.  The focus of the grant will be on wellness interventions such as yoga, music therapy, and diet to determine their impact on patients in the study.

It is an ambitious study and a high-profile one. It is estimated that one in every six people worldwide has a neurological disease such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, MS, stroke or epilepsy.  For the patients and by extension their families, this study holds importance.  Currently there is no way to predict who will become sick or how to cure or stop the progression of these diseases once they are diagnosed.

For More Information on the Cleveland Clinic Brain Study

Guests: 

Imad Najm, MD, Vice Chair, Neurological Institute for Strategy and Innovation, Cleveland Clinic 
Zadie Barber, Volunteer, Eliza Bryant Village, Crain's 8 over 80 
Matt MacLaren, Director, TourismOhio  
Oanh Powell, Executive Committee, Cleveland Asian Festival  
Aphrodite Ganotis, Chair, Tremont Greek Festival 
 

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